Replere(R) by Dr. Debbie Palmer

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0 comment(s) | Posted under Healthy Skin, | Posted under New antioxidant studies

A review of the research on the health benefits of coffee, plus how to brew a cup of coffee to get even more health-promoting antioxidants.

To get the most antioxidants from your cup of coffee, use a medium (not dark) roast, grind the beans (stored in an airtight container) right before brewing, and brew in an espresso maker or old-fashioned percolator (brewing with coffee filters tends to strip out some of the antioxidants).

I’ve always loved a cup of coffee in the morning—but I’ve come to love it even more over the years as more and more research is done about the health benefits of coffee. I wanted to recap some of the most recent studies to date, but first I wanted to share my own coffee story with you.

Before I even started thinking about launching an antioxidant-based skincare line, I traveled to places like Mexico, Jamaica, and South America, where I had the opportunity to visit coffee farms. And what I consistently heard and saw: coffee pickers had hands that were youthful looking…more youthful than the skin on the rest of their bodies, which was showing all the normal signs of aging (thanks to many hours spent in the sun): weathered, rough skin; wrinkles; and age spots. But the hands—which came into contact daily with the berry of the coffee plant—were not.

It was then that I discovered that this berry of the coffee plant (also called Coffea arabica), shown above, is one of the richest sources of health-promoting and anti-aging antioxidants. So I knew that I had to make this berry the key ingredient in a skincare line, which I decided to call REPLERE (which means “replenish” in Latin). The clinical research I did on the products helps back up what I saw with the coffee pickers’ hands; after 12 weeks of twice-daily use, study participants showed an improvement in the firmness, clarity, roughness, hyperpigmentation, blotchy redness, fine lines and wrinkles, and overall brightness of their skin.

REPLERE is the only skincare product that taps into the restorative and youth-enhancing power of coffee.

But I wanted you to know this to help you understand why I’m such a huge fan of coffee. Here is some additional research about the benefits of coffee!

√ It helps lower your cancer risk. Brand-new research—presented at the American Association of Cancer Researchers meeting in San Diego—suggests that people who drink at least a cup a day have a lower risk of liver cancer compared to those who only indulge occasionally. Study participants were tracked for 18 years; it was the regular coffee drinkers who had up to a 42 reduced risk of this type of cancer! Beyond liver cancer, studies have suggested that coffee may be tied to reduced risk for head and neck cancers, colorectal cancers, prostate cancer, and bladder, endometrial, esophageal and pancreatic cancers.

√ It helps keep your heart healthy. Drinking two 8-ounce cups of coffee each day helps reduce your risk of heart failure by 11 percent, according to a study in the journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

√ It helps keep your vision sharp. As I mentioned in an earlier blog, food scientists say you may reap another health benefit from a daily cup of joe: prevention of deteriorating eyesight and possible blindness from retinal degeneration due to glaucoma, aging and diabetes.

√ It helps prevent diabetes. And speaking of diabetes, sipping four or more cups of coffee throughout the day may reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 50 percent, says a recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.

√ It helps lower depression. Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health found that women who drink two to three cups a day lowered their risk of depression by 15 percent. (The study was published in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.)

√ It may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. A study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease found that drinking at least three cups of coffee a day could prevent the onset of this disease. Plus, a Finnish study found that those who drank three to five cups of coffee a day at midlife had a 65 percent lower risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease in late-life than those who drank no coffee at all.

So there you have it: the latest research. Now you know why I’m such a huge fan.

Now, relax…and go have a cup of coffee!

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0 comment(s) | Skin Aging, | The Sun & Your Skin

Dermatologist Dr. Debbie Palmer explains just why the sun's UVA and UVB rays are so bad for the skin—and what you can do to prevent short-term (and long-term) skin damage and skin cancer.

Avoid the sun’s rays, if you can, by staying out of the sun altogether or seeking out the shade whenever possible.

We’ve all heard about the fact that the sun’s UV rays can damage the skin, both causing cancer and aging it—but what most people don’t realize is that there are different types of UV radiation.

Since July is UV Awareness Month, I thought this would be a perfect time to help explain the difference between the UV rays—and talk about just why they’re so dangerous to the skin. (I did a project on this in the 6th grade; it’s something I’ve always been passionate about!)

The sun’s ultraviolet or UV rays are divided into: UVA rays, UVB rays, and UVC rays. All are invisible to the human eye—and all UV radiation can damage the skin’s cellular DNA, triggering genetic mutations (which can then cause cancer). For years, it was thought that UVB rays were the most damaging to the skin, but it’s only been in recent years that researchers and scientists have discovered that UVA rays are even more harmful. Bottom line: all UV light is a proven human carcinogen. (Take a look at this illustration, below, from the American Cancer Society to see just how UV light can affect the skin.)

How UV Rays Affect the Skin

 

What you need to know:

UVA light—or Ultraviolet A Radiation—are called long-wave rays because they have a wavelength of 320 to 400 nanometres or nm (how wavelength is measured). This type of radiation is not filtered by the earth’s ozone layer, meaning as much as 150% as much UVA reaches the earth’s surface as UVB.

Why you need to be concerned: This light penetrates deep into the skin—into the mid-dermis—and is responsible for tanning and also for skin cancer, eye damage (including cataracts), and the breakdown of collagen, the main structural protein responsible for supporting the skin. (Note: when collagen breaks down, the skin sags—a key factor in premature aging.) And what’s more, these UV rays are present year round, at all times of the day, and can penetrate through clouds and glass.

“A tan results from injury to the skin's DNA; the skin darkens in an attempt to prevent further DNA damage. These imperfections, or mutations, can lead to skin cancer. Tanning beds are particularly bad for your skin because they emit only UVA rays. In fact, tanning salons emit doses of UVA as much as 12 times that of the sun.”

A good way to remember what UVA rays do to the skin is: the “A” in UVA is for “Aging”

UVB light—or Ultraviolet B Radiation—has a wavelength of 290 to 320 nm. It’s somewhat filtered by the ozone, but it only makes up about 4 to 5% of UV light (UVA makes up the rest).

Why you need to be concerned: This UV light penetrates less deep than UVA rays; it penetrates to the basal, or bottom, layer of the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), where melanocytes—the cells responsible for pigment—are found. This is the type of light that can cause burning of the skin as well as skin cancer—and eye damage (including cataracts). While UVA rays are present at all times of the day, year round, UVB radiation is most prevalent between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and it doesn’t penetrate glass. 

“UV radiation—both UVA and UVB—can also suppress the immune system, why people with herpes seem to break out in cold sores after exposure to the sun.” 

A good way to remember what UVB rays do to the skin is: the “B” in UVB is for “Burning”

Take a look at this helpful illustration from the Skin Cancer Foundation:

UVA and UVB Radiation and the Skin

 

UVC light—or Ultraviolet C Radiation—has a wavelength of 100 to 290 nm and is completely filtered out by the ozone layer so 0% reaches the earth’s surface.

Why you need to be concerned: This type of ultraviolet radiation could become a concern if the hole in the ozone layer ever grew to affect more of the earth.

"Did you know? UV radiation reduces our collagen production by 80% for 48 to 72 hours—within 24 hours of exposure to the sun."

Some things you can do to protect yourself from the sun’s UV rays:

√ Always wear broad-spectrum sunscreen (this protects against both UVA and UVB rays) whenever you’re outdoors—whether it’s 7 in the morning or 3 in the afternoon.

√ Avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.—when UVB’s burning rays are most prevalent.

√ Never use a tanning bed. People who use tanning beds are 2.5 times more likely to develop a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop a type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma. In fact, according to researchers, when teens use tanning beds, they increase their risk of melanoma (the deadliest kind of skin cancer) by an incredible 75 percent!

√ Consider adding UV-protective film to your car's side and rear windows (many front windshields typically have it already) as well as to house and business windows—to block up to 99.9 percent of UVA radiation.

√ Know that clothing is UV-protective. Thicker shirts have more SPF than thinner ones, and darker colors give you more SPF protection than lighter colors. Clothing labeled UPF is also specifically protective against the sun’s rays.

√ Wear UV-protective sunglasses whenever you’re outdoors to shield your eyes from damaging UV rays.

I hope this information helps you protect yourself against the sun’s rays. Know that while UV light is a proven human carcinogen, skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer.

Stay sun safe!

Dr. Debbie Palmer

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0 comment(s) | Healthy Skin, | Skin Aging

Dermatologist Dr. Debbie Palmer weighs in about coffee’s antioxidants—and the fact that they promote good health and sharper vision.

The right diet—and daily skin care—will help keep your eyes more youthful-looking for years to come.

We’ve always heard that carrots can help your eyesight—thanks to beta-carotene, the antioxidant, that they contain. But now, a recent study, conducted by researchers at Cornell University, found that the unique antioxidants in coffee may also be critical in helping keep eyesight sharp throughout your life.

Lead researcher Chang Y. Lee, a professor of food science at Cornell, had this to say about the study: “The retina is a thin tissue layer on the inside, back wall of the eye with millions of light-sensitive cells and other nerve cells that receive and organize visual information. It is also one of the most metabolically active tissues, demanding high levels of oxygen and making it prone to oxidative stress. The lack of oxygen and production of free radicals leads to tissue damage and loss of sight.”

But antioxidants—particularly those in coffee—can help to reverse this process.

I’m not surprised by this finding because, through my own independent research, I’ve also found that coffee—namely the berry of the coffee plant called Coffea arabica—is one of the richest sources of antioxidants. This is why I made this the key ingredient in my REPLERE products.

"Coffee—namely the berry of the coffee plant called Coffea arabica—is one of the richest sources of antioxidants."

REPLERE Restore & Fortify Beauty Shooters, shown below, not only contain Coffea arabica, but also a mix of some of the other most powerful and reparative antioxidants: camu camu (a vitamin C-packed fruit), goji and açai berries, chokeberry, blueberries, pomegranate, and resveratrol. I’ve always known that this daily one-ounce drink can help reverse inflammation in the body—and on the skin. But now, it seems that its antioxidants may also be able to help keep vision sharp.

"Did you know? Coffee is the single most commonly consumed antioxidant source in the United States. The average American drinks 1.64 cups of coffee per day, yielding 1,229 milligrams of antioxidants, four times the amount of antioxidants Americans get from tea."

With that said, coffee’s antioxidants aren’t the only thing that can keep your eyes sharp—and beautiful. Follow these three tips for beautiful eyes, from the inside out:

REPLERE Eye Serum and Beauty Shooter1. Eat a balanced diet rich in colorful fruits and vegetables. The antioxidants called carotenoids (these give the yellow-orange and red pigment to fruits and vegetables like carrots) are also found in mangoes, squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, cantaloupe, peaches, apricots, red grapefruit, and more. These foods are all rich in beta-carotene, a form of vitamin A that helps produce pigments in the retina—key to seeing in the dark and in poorly lit areas.

Carotenoids are found, too, in dark green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale. You may have heard of the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin—both are carotenoids important for keeping vision sharp. In one study, published in the journal Clinics in Dermatology, researchers discovered that these two key antioxidants are actually found in a portion of the eye where light is focused by the lens—why getting enough of these in your diet may help protect against potential damage to this part of the eye.

2. Apply antioxidants—as well as sun protection—around the eyes. We know that the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays cause premature aging (think: wrinkling, pigmentation, and age spots) on the skin. But this can happen even more so on the skin around the eyes, which is extremely thin. This is why I always recommend using a non-chemical sunscreen around the eyes (these won’t sting the eyes, so you don’t have to constantly worry about your sunscreen running into your eyes). But first, always layer an antioxidant—like REPLERE Renew & Firm Eye Serum (above)—underneath the sunscreen for added protection. Independent research shows that doing so will help protect your skin even more from the sun’s UV rays, which trigger aging free radicals.

3. Always wear a pair of sunglasses when outdoors. Look for wide lenses that block 100 percent of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays and cover the entire area around your eyes. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, without UV protection, your eyes are more vulnerable to diseases that cause vision loss— like macular degeneration and cataracts— as well as to cancers of the eyes and eyelid. UV glasses will also prevent eyestrain from squinting on bright, sunny days.

I hope these tips help keep your eyes beautiful—inside and out.

Stay sharp & healthy!

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1 comment(s) | Healthy Skin

May is Melanoma Awareness Month. New York dermatologist Dr. Debbie Palmer debunks common melanoma (and sun protection) myths just in time for beach season.

Wide-brimmed hats offer added sun protection for the face, ears, and the back of the neck. Baseball caps and sun visors aren't recommended as they leave the ears and the back of the neck exposed.

Did you know that melanoma is the deadliest skin cancer—but, when caught early, it’s a treatable cancer? With the start of summer right around the corner and May being Melanoma Awareness Month, I wanted to share some important facts about skin cancer (please read them and share them as this information is so critical to your—and your family and friends'—health).

Myth: Most moles are cancerous.

Not true. Moles are common. Almost everyone has a few, and some people develop hundreds. Individuals with light skin tend to have more moles, with the average ranging from 10 to 40. And not all moles look alike. Even in the same individual, moles can differ in size, shape, or color—and they can be raised or flat. Moles can even have hair.

While not all moles are cancerous, you should have a yearly mole check with a dermatologist to be sure yours are okay (particularly if you have a family history of skin cancer and/or have had a lot of sun exposure in the past). In the meantime, though, perform monthly skin checks to keep an eye out for these ABCDEs of melanoma:

A stands for asymmetry. When one half is unlike the other half, call your dermatologist.

B stands for border. Irregular, scalloped, or poorly defined borders are all concerning.

C stands for color. Varied color from one area to another, shades of tan and brown, black, for example (and even white, red, or blue).

D stands for diameter. Melanomas are usually greater than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser), but they can be smaller.

E stands for evolving. A mole or skin lesion that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape, or color is a reason to call your dermatologist.

 

“Moles should not change. A mole that is changing in size, shape, or color is a reason to call your dermatologist.”

 

Myth: If you’re spending less than 15 minutes outside, you don’t need sunscreen.

Not true. You need sun protection, every day, cloudy or sunny—whether you’re spending 5 minutes or 5 hours in the sun. I’m a big proponent of applying some sort of sun protection in the morning, every day, so when you head outside, even for 5 minutes, you’re protected.

This type of incidental sun exposure (5 minutes here, 5 minutes there over the course of a lifetime) is one key cause of premature aging of the skin—and even skin cancer. The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays trigger the production of free radicals in the skin; it’s these free radicals that trigger wrinkles, rough skin, and hyperpigmentation—all signs of skin’s premature aging.

Sunscreen can block these UV rays, preventing them from penetrating the skin—why any sun exposure is bad exposure in my book. Worried about getting enough vitamin D—the sun vitamin? I recommend eating a healthy diet rich in foods that contain vitamin D (like salmon, sardines, and dairy). You can also take a supplement if you can’t get enough vitamin D—600 to 800 IU daily is recommended— from your diet. These are much safer options than sitting, unprotected, for any length of time in the sun.

What is also critical: antioxidants. They are the only things that can actually neutralize free radicals, returning them to a less damaging state. This is why I believe so strongly in my own REPLERE products: they contain the highest amounts of free-radical-reversing antioxidants on the market. I use them regularly on myself and on my family, particularly the REPLERE Protect & Rejuvenate Day Lotion and the REPLERE Repair & Replenish Night Crème (which also is the perfect healing antidote for skin at night when you’ve gotten too much sun during the day); both are shown above. Always layer antioxidants under a sunscreen so you get double the protection.

 

“Antioxidants have been shown to protect and reverse the damage that we receive from sun exposure.”

 

Myth: Skin cancer can only appear on the face, back, chest, arms, and legs.

This is true, but skin cancer can also appear in less-common spots like on the scalp, between the fingers and the toes, on the palms and soles of the feet, under the nails, on the ears, and even on the eyelids and genitals. Be sure to examine your entire body monthly (use a mirror to check your scalp and your genitals) for irregular moles—and have your dermatologist check you yearly.

Myth: When you get skin cancer, it’s deadly.

This is true, but only if it’s caught too late. The statistics tell us that one person dies of melanoma every hour, but this very important to note: if you catch skin cancer early enough (through regular self exams and dermatologist checks), it is treatable and doesn’t have to be deadly.

 

"Reduce your sun exposure, and you’ll reduce your risk of skin cancer dramatically. In fact, your risk of melanoma increases if you’ve had five or more sunburns in your lifetime."

 

With that said, here are my tips on staying safe in the sun this coming weekend—and all summer (and year) long:

√ Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen. Your sunscreen should protect against ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B (UVA/UVB) rays, should be water-resistant, and should have a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 30 or more. Regular daily use sunscreen reduces your risk of developing melanoma by 50 percent.

√ Apply sunscreen to all exposed skin, and re-apply every 2 hours, even on cloudy days and after swimming and sweating.

√ Wear protective clothing such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide brimmed hat, and wide sunglasses—labeled as 100% UV protective—whenever possible. Also look for sun-protective fabrics (these will say they have a UPF protection factor).

√ Seek shade when appropriate. Remember that the sun's rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

√ Protect children from sun exposure by encouraging them to play in the shade, dressing them in protective clothing, and applying sunscreen regularly.

√ Use extra caution near water and sand (as well as near snow and ice, in the winter) as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun, which can increase your chance of sunburn.

√ Avoid tanning beds as ultraviolet light from the sun and tanning beds can trigger skin cancer and cause premature wrinkling.

So if you’re planning on getting away to the beach for Memorial Day Weekend—or any time this summer—or just plan to spend time outdoors, do your skin a favor and slather up.

Have fun, stay safe,

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0 comment(s) | Healthy Skin

New York dermatologist Dr. Debbie Palmer identifies the top 3 nutrients (magnesium, vitamin C, and zinc, all antioxidants) you need for better health—and more radiant, youthful skin.

You need 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. Try to incorporate them into every meal—and snack. (One serving is one half a cup or one medium fruit/veggie.)

Nothing could be truer than that old saying, “You are what you eat”. When you eat a healthy diet—rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, olive oil and other healthy fats, fish, lean meat, and plenty of water—you’re healthier and have more energy. Your skin looks radiant and more youthful as well.

But a question I commonly get in my practice is: “What are the most important nutrients that I need?” This is a hard question to answer as your body really needs a balance of all key nutrients. I’m going to focus here, though, on three critical antioxidant nutrients your body needs—and why.

Magnesium: This mineral is essential to more than 300 enzyme systems that regulate things like muscle and nerve function, blood glucose levels, the production of the key sleep hormone melatonin, and blood pressure (to name just a few!).

Low magnesium levels (which can be triggered by many things including stress and medications like antibiotics, diuretics, and beta blockers) can lead to exhaustion, irritation, and sleeplessness, as well as to stress and anxiety. Your primary care doctor can test your magnesium levels with a red blood cell magnesium test (which can be added to a routine blood test).

“Magnesium helps regulate cortisol — too much of which can lead to anxiety — as well as melatonin, which is essential for sleep.”

Magnesium-rich foods include green leafy vegetables like spinach, legumes, nuts like almonds, seeds, and whole grains, as well as dark chocolate (a good reason to indulge every once in a while, in moderation!).

How much you need: Take a look at this helpful chart from the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

 

Vitamin C: This powerful antioxidant vitamin—also known as ascorbic acid—helps the immune system work efficiently to protect the body, improves the absorption of iron from plant-based foods, and is essential for the production of collagen (a structural protein required for wound healing and also critical in keeping the skin youthful looking).

Not getting enough vitamin C can result in fatigue, inflammation of the gums (indicated by swollen, bleeding gums), joint pain, poor wound healing and, in some people, even depression. Again, if you or your doctor suspects you may be deficient in vitamin C, he or she can order a blood test.

Vitamin C-rich foods include citrus fruits, red and green peppers, kiwifruit, broccoli, strawberries, and tomatoes.

“The vitamin C content of foods can be reduced by prolonged storage and cooking. If you can, eat vitamin C-rich foods raw — or cook for a very short time — to maintain the vitamin C levels.”  

How much you need: Take a look at this helpful chart from the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

Zinc: This antioxidant mineral is involved in all aspects of metabolism, immune function, wound healing, and cell division, as well as normal growth and development. It’s also essential for maintaining a normal sense of taste and smell. A deficiency of zinc can trigger hair loss, loss of appetite, and impaired immune function—to name just a few. Talk to your doctor if you suspect you may be deficient; a simple blood test can determine your levels.

“A daily intake of zinc is critical as the body is unable to produce, or store, zinc.” 

Zinc-rich foods include oysters (which contain more zinc per serving than any other food), liver, crimini mushrooms, spinach, pumpkin seeds, crab, and beef.

How much do you need: Take a look at this chart from the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

I always recommend getting as much of the key nutrients you need from healthy food. If you can’t, then supplement.

Be healthy, be well, 

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1 comment(s) | Skin Aging

The most common habits that cause premature skin aging—and practical tips on how to change them—from top dermatologist Dr. Debbie Palmer.

Beautiful skin isn't all in the genes. There's plenty you can do to, on a daily basis, to keep skin youthful and radiant.

Is there a “miracle” way to prevent skin aging? In my busy practice, I get a lot of questions about how to reduce and prevent premature skin aging, and I can say this: There is no miracle, but staying out of the sun is first and foremost and can make a huge difference in how your skin ages. The sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays trigger the production of free radicals, which contribute to the breakdown of the key youth-building substance, collagen. (Collagen is the structural protein that gives your skin its fullness. Without collagen, skin develops wrinkles and sags.) Next up is lifestyle: eating a healthy balance of the right foods (like colorful, antioxidant-rich fruits and veggies), drinking enough water, exercising to reduce stress, and getting enough sleep all help to slow down the skin’s aging process, too.

 

"Eating a healthy balance of the right foods (like colorful, antioxidant-rich fruits and veggies), drinking enough water, exercising to reduce stress, and getting enough sleep all help to slow down the skin’s aging process."

 

What that said, though, there are some simple tweaks you can make to your daily habits that can also make a difference:

1) BECOME A BACK SLEEPER. No matter how soft your pillow, sleeping on your side or with your face in the pillow causes the skin to crease and the fabric—from the pillowcase—to bunch up, putting pressure on your face every single night. Over time, this repeated action can create sleep lines on your face and neck, which can become permanent wrinkles. Sleeping on your back is the best option to avoid these lines. Some patients have told me they find it helpful to place a pillow under their knees or molded next to their body to prevent them from sleeping on their stomach or on their side. If you absolutely can’t avoid sleeping with your face in the pillow, invest in a silk pillowcase. The slippery surface of these pillowcases reduces the friction between your skin and the fabric, minimizing the bunching up of fabric that contributes to deep creases.

 

"Invest in a silk pillowcase. The slippery surface of these pillowcases reduces the friction between your skin and the fabric, minimizing the bunching up of fabric that contributes to deep creases."

 

2) WEAR A SWEATER AT HOME—INSTEAD OF CRANKING UP THE HEAT. Excessive heat sucks the moisture out of air, dehydrating skin (and hair) and making wrinkles more pronounced. Keep heat moderate (around 68°F or 69°F), drink plenty of water, and use a humidifier to combat dehydration. Optimal humidity levels are between 40 and 60% (a humidistat can measure these levels so you know when to leave the humidifier running and when to shut it off).

3) SKIP THE STRAWS. Drinking through a straw every once in awhile is not going to cause wrinkles, but if you make it a regular habit several times a day (or more) over many years, it can contribute to upper and lower lip (perioral) wrinkle formation. The simple reason: The more you fold the skin in this area or pucker your lips (like a smoker does), the more creased (and wrinkled) skin in this area becomes.

 

"The more you pucker your lips, the more creased (and wrinkled) skin in this area becomes."

 

4) LIMIT ALCOHOL INTAKE. Even though red wine is a good source of antioxidants, drinking a lot of it—or any alcohol, for that matter—isn’t good for any part of your body, skin included. One of the main reasons is that alcohol acts as a diuretic, causing dehydration. This can cause your skin to look older and more wrinkled; it can also make skin look pale or gray in color. (Too much alcohol is also toxic for your liver, which can contribute to skin discoloration.) It helps to drink water in between drinks to stay hydrated, but it’s better to limit your drinks from the get-go!

Excessive alcohol also reduces blood levels of vitamin A, an important antioxidant for your skin that’s critical for collagen production. It helps to drink antioxidants (coffee and green tea are good sources) or eat antioxidants—and to apply them topically to neutralize these effects. Replenish from the inside and out!

Alcohol is also a vasodilator that widens the blood vessels of the face—causing facial redness and swelling. Over time, these vessels can become more visible as broken capillaries or persistent redness.

My philosophy: It’s always best to maintain a healthy balance in life to keep your body healthy—and your skin looking it’s youthful, radiant best.

Stay beautiful!

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Westchester, New York dermatologist Dr. Debbie Palmer explains why free radicals are so bad for the body—and why antioxidants can help reverse their effects.

The deeper the color of the fruit or veggie, the more antioxidants it contains. Blueberries, shown here, are chockfull of antioxidants thanks to their deep blue color.

As the Medical Director of Dermatology Associates of New York, in Westchester, NY, and founder of REPLERE, I always get questions about why free radicals are so bad for the skin and the body. That’s why I wanted to explain free radicals, here, in the easiest way possible.

When exposed to oxygen, metal rusts and apples turn brown. The same thing happens in our bodies—except this reaction happens as a result of many things, not just exposure to oxygen. For example, exposure to pollution (including secondhand cigarette smoke and car exhaust), the sun’s ultraviolet rays, pesticides, and processed foods can all trigger this reaction in the body. Stress—emotional and physical—can trigger the production of free radicals in the body, too.

This creation of free radicals in the body can, over time, result in illness and disease, as well as premature aging, because these free radicals attack healthy cells, changing their structure and the way they function.

But antioxidants can reverse this process—and that’s why I’m such a huge fan of antioxidants. The body has natural antioxidants to essentially “fight” the effects of free radicals, but when the body is under stress itself, its antioxidant stores can get depleted.

Eating plenty of colorful fruits and veggies and beans (like kidney beans and black beans) can help shore up the body’s antioxidant defenses to prevent the production of free radicals. But sometimes, we can’t get enough—why I created REPLERE Restore & Fortify Beauty Shooters. These one-ounce drinks contain your day’s worth of antioxidants and conveniently fit into your bag (and don’t need to be refrigerated) so you can take them with you anywhere.

But the entire line of REPLERE products helps keep the skin youthful and radiant because it targets the five free radicals that damage and age the skin: peroxyl, hydroxyl, peroxynitrite, superoxide anion, and singlet oxygen. REPLERE is really the first complete antioxidant solution for this reason—and is just one reason why I’m just so proud of this line of products.

So if I leave you with anything today, it’s this: be sure to eat plenty of colorful fruits and veggies like berries, leafy greens, broccoli, and red bell peppers (the more color they have, the more antioxidants they contain); be sure you’re taking steps to reduce stress every day; protect your skin from the sun with antioxidants layered under a sunscreen, and get enough sleep (too little sleep stresses the body, triggering the production of free radicals).

Have a beautiful day!

Dr. Debbie

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0 comment(s) | New antioxidant studies

Dermatologist and leading antioxidant expert Dr. Debbie Palmer weighs in on two new studies highlighting how a healthy body equals healthy skin.

When it comes to the skin, I’m fascinated by everything about it. In fact, as many of my friends know, I’ve wanted to be a dermatologist since I was in junior high. At that time, I was 11 years old and in the 6th grade. We were asked to give our first oral presentation to the class — and I chose to speak about, you guessed it, the skin! I can remember my mother asking me what I was preparing and when I told her, she wanted to know why skin and not a topic that was more fun. My response to her: nothing else is nearly as fun as talking about skin! I still feel the same way today!

"When it comes to the skin, I’m fascinated by everything about it."

With that bit of background on me, I wanted to share two fascinating new healthy body/healthy skin studies that have come out—and that we’ve shared with our Facebook fans (by the way, we’re so excited to have just passed 4,000 likes!) and Twitter followers. If you’re not following us yet, please do to stay on top of all this news.

• A healthy body = radiant, glowing skin. The body and the skin are absolutely interconnected, something I’ve believed for a long time. So I was excited to see a new study from the University of Southern Denmark that says skin—the largest organ in the body—actually communicates with the liver, which is the organ that filters out toxins. This is why—if something’s going on inside our body—it’s often reflected in the skin (rashes, eczema, wrinkles, sallow skin, etc.) This is proof why taking the holistic approach to health and our body is so important.

"The body and the skin are absolutely interconnected, something I’ve believed for a long time."

• Smoking is at the top of the worst-things-you-can-do-for-your-skin list (right there next to going out in the sun without sunscreen). One reason why: it creates free radicals in the body—and in the skin. And it’s these free radicals that trigger diseases and stimulate the production of enzymes that break down collagen and elastin more quickly, triggering skin damage, including wrinkles, dullness, brown spots, loss of elasticity (e.g. sagging skin), and rough texture. A new study of twins, published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, backs this all up. The researchers found that twins who smoke show significantly more premature facial aging, compared to their nonsmoking identical twins.

"Free radicals trigger diseases and stimulate the production of enzymes that break down collagen and elastin more quickly, triggering skin damage, including wrinkles, dullness, brown spots, loss of elasticity, and rough texture."

One of the reasons I created REPLERE Restore & Fortify Beauty Shooters was to help people stay healthy on the inside, so they can look radiant and healthy on the outside. Each of these one-ounce bottles contains powerful antioxidants—which are essentially nature’s defense against free radicals. If you can eat enough colorful fruits and veggies (think: brightly colored peppers, blueberries, kale, carrots, sweet potatoes…) every day, then all the better! But if you can’t, these daily Beauty Shooters can help give your body what it needs.

Have a beautiful day!

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Are you new to Replere? Welcome! This month, Dr. Palmer talks about the backbone of Replere skincare – antioxidants! And why they are the secret to glowing, healthy, youthful looking skin. Read on!

Welcome to REPLERE!

Recently we passed the 3,000 “Like” mark on our Facebook page – woohoo! Facebook is an active, thriving community of Replere friends & family, and it’s a place where we choose to share daily thoughts, inspirations, ideas and sometimes a recipe or two, as well as important information about Replere products. Still, we thought this might be a great time to talk about the backbone of Replere skincare – antioxidants – in more depth, for those who are new to the brand, the products and its philosophy.

A few quick Replere® facts:

• Created by dermatologist and leading antioxidant expert Dr. Debbie Palmer, REPLERE skincare products are formulated with Coffea arabica extract (or Green Coffee Extract), the un-ripened berry of the coffee plant, which is a top dietary source of antioxidants. They also contain a mix of other potent antioxidants including pine bark, goji and açai berries, grapeseed, pomegranate, green tea, and vitamins A, C, & E.

• REPLERE’s exclusive blend of antioxidants neutralizes age-accelerating free radicals—created from exposure to sunlight, pollution (including secondhand cigarette smoke and car exhaust), emotional and physical stress, poor diet, and even exercise. In doing so, they slow down aging of the skin.

• REPLERE® crème formulas are packaged in airless containers to avoid decreased potency from air exposure - and bacterial contamination - that can occur though daily use. The REPLERE collection is also paraben, fragrance, BPA and dye-free. REPLERE products are vegan and never, ever tested on animals.

“I developed REPLERE as a collection of repair products for your skin, ” says REPLERE founder Dr. Debbie Palmer. “They are designed to be applied to the skin first, under your moisturizer, and in weeks, they will make a visible difference in the overall appearance of your skin.”

Now, let’s discuss antioxidants, free radicals and what to do about them:

Q: We’ve heard a lot of talk about antioxidants being good for the body—and the skin. But if I’m a healthy person, and I take my daily supplements, do I really need antioxidants too?

Dr. Palmer: We all need—and use—oxygen to live. After we breathe it in, oxygen travels from our lungs to every cell in our body, helping to turn food into energy.

But oxygen can also have negative effects, whether you’re healthy or not. Body cells are stable when their molecules have a full set of electrons. When oxygen enters the picture, though, they can lose an electron, becoming unstable or oxidized—the same chemical reaction that causes metal to rust. Losing an electron to a passing oxygen molecule converts that cell’s molecule to an unstable, and damaging, atom known as a free radical.

Antioxidants are the body’s main defense against free radicals. Antioxidants—which can be produced in the body or be obtained from food sources or, in the case of the skin, from topical products—donate missing electrons to free radicals and return them to a normal state.

Q: Why are free radicals so bad?

Dr. Palmer: Free radicals attack cells in the body. These attacks change the structure and function of cells and how they work. Cellular damage caused by free radicals is a key part of the aging process—and may even contribute to the development of some of our most prevalent diseases, including coronary artery disease and cancer.

When it comes to the skin, free radicals stimulate the production of enzymes, which break down collagen and elastin—triggering premature aging (wrinkles and sagging skin).

Q: Aren’t free radicals caused by sun exposure?

Dr. Palmer: Yes, free radicals can be created in the body as a result of exposure to ultraviolet light (through sunlight or a tanning booth). But they can also be triggered through environmental exposure to cigarette smoke (breathing in secondhand smoke or even simply having it pass over the skin), car exhaust, factory pollution, pesticides (in our food and water supply), and insecticides (used in the home, our yards, and in the environment around us).

Poor diet (not eating enough fruits and vegetables and/or eating foods high in bad fats) can lead to the production of free radicals—as can lack of sleep and stress. Free radicals can also be formed while digesting large meals—why eating small, frequent meals is best.

Even exercise—though it’s good for you—causes an increase in free radical production. Because of this, it’s important to consume a diet high in antioxidants and to apply antioxidant products daily to your skin.

Q: So what can we do to slow down the production of free radicals in the body?

Dr. Palmer: Keep in mind that the human body has evolved the ability to produce natural antioxidants to protect it from free radical damage. But during times of high oxidative stress (caused by an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen and a person’s ability to neutralize it and repair the resulting damage), the body’s natural antioxidants are not sufficient to control these free radicals, and excess damage and accelerated aging—even disease—can occur.

Eating the right foods and supplementing regularly serves to augment the body’s natural supply of antioxidants, helping to prevent excess damage.

Coming up next month: To prep for the holidays, we’ll talk about antioxidants & food and why it’s so important to make sure we keep a balance between holiday treats and healthy treats.
 

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September can be a stressful month. And more stress hormones equals increased chance of acne. Replere has Acne Solutions.

September can be a stressful month. For many, September means back to school. For others, it's Fashion Week. For all of us, it means packed schedules, increased work travel, transitioning to fall wardrobes, cleaning out closets, school supply lists (which seem to get longer and longer every year!). The days get shorter, the weather cooler. All of a sudden it takes twice as long to get out the door. The increased stress takes a toll on our skin -- and we're not just talking about fine lines, wrinkles and dark circles!

Stress can lead to increased secretion of stress hormones -- in both adults and kids. And the result? ACNE.

We're here with good news about acne, though. Based on new research, the dermatology community is re-thinking what causes it and how to treat it -- on the inside & on your skin. The secret? Antioxidants, which can be used to treat acne both orally and topically.

Which we think is great news...since antioxidants are our specialty! And since antioxidants are all-natural, healthy, safe and effective, it's a breakthrough method of treatment for acne sufferers of all ages.

So what's new?

Acne vulgaris is a common dermatologic condition. It is characterized by sebum overproduction, follicular hyperkeratinization and inflammation. Over the past year, we have learned that all acne is inflammatory and that patients with acne are under increased skin and systemic oxidative stress from this inflammation. Research has shown that the normal antioxidant defense system becomes overwhelmed in acne patients from this oxidative stress and that antioxidants are consumed at a faster pace, both in the skin and systemically (as seen in lab blood tests). Recent evidence suggests that inflammation might actually precede all of the other steps in what causes acne. As a result, acne sufferers may benefit from treatment with both topical and oral antioxidants to neutralize the inflammation and replace the normal reserves.

Recently, Dr. Palmer introduced the REPLERE® Acne Solutions Kit, after several months of working with her acne-prone patients. Because REPLERE is packed with antioxidants, such as Coffea arabica extract, they are an ideal topical and oral treatment for acne – powerful, all natural and suitable for all skin types.

"My acne patients on both traditional treatments and oral and topical antioxidant treatments are telling me that their acne has never been better. Some have even stopped some of their traditional treatments because they are doing so well. They often tell me that they are addicted to their new antioxidant regimen! I'm pleased that the antioxidant regimen (our new Replere Acne Solutions Kit) is effectively addressing the acne pathway close to the root and in a natural way."

The REPLERE Acne Solutions Kit, $107 (10% off suggested retail price of the three products), comes complete with:

• REPLERE Deep Clean & Clarify Face Wash ($38) contains the powerful antioxidants Coffea arabica extract (berry from the coffee plant), green tea, and vitamins A and E, as well as exfoliating glycolic, salicylic, and azelaic acids. This cleanser not only helps to restore antioxidant levels on the skin (particularly when left on for at least three minutes), but it also exfoliates dead skin cells that can clog pores.

• REPLERE Pore Minimize & Mattify Skin Tonic ($42) a non-drying alcohol-free formula, contains the powerful antioxidants Coffea arabica extract, green tea, grapeseed, and rosemary. It also contains exfoliating glycolic, salicylic, and azelaic acids to cleanse pores and help dissolve oil.

• REPLERE Restore & Fortify Beauty Shooters ($37 for 14, one-ounce single-serve bottles) feed your body—and your skin—from the inside. Each one contains the powerful antioxidants Coffea arabica extract, resveratrol, camu camu (a vitamin C-packed fruit), goji and açai berries, chokeberry, blueberries and pomegranate.

“These products are effective on their own if you have mild acne,” says Dr. Debbie Palmer. “If you have more severe acne, these products work well with any doctor-prescribed acne treatments like oral (and topical) antibiotics and Retin-A. In fact, I’ve seen better results from treatments like this when my patients were also using topical and oral antioxidants.”

REPLERE® products are paraben, fragrance, and dye-free, as well as vegan, cruelty-free and BPA free.
 

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Recent Posts

The Good News About Coffee
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on August 09, 2014

How UV Radiation Can Damage Your Skin
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on July 16, 2014

Antioxidants: The Secret to Sharp Vision?
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on June 10, 2014

Must-Read, Life-Saving Advice About Melanoma
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3 Key Nutrients You Need for Better Health (and Skin)
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The Top Causes of Premature Skin Aging
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on March 17, 2014

A Completely Natural Way to Slow Down Aging
Posted by SKAGGS Admin on February 25, 2014

Healthy Body Really Does Equal Healthy Skin
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on January 14, 2014

Dr. Palmer Q&A: Aging & Antioxidants
Posted by Replere on November 05, 2013

Stress Can Lead to Acne. Replere Provides Solutions.
Posted by Replere on September 05, 2013

Fall Forward: Gracefully, Healthfully, Beautifully
Posted by Replere on September 04, 2013

July 2013: Sun Skin Saver Tips
Posted by Replere on August 01, 2013

June 2013: Food for Thought…And Healthy Skin
Posted by Replere on June 28, 2013

May 2013: Stay Young Tips
Posted by Replere on May 30, 2013

April 2013 Faves
Posted by Replere on April 23, 2013

Dr. Debbie Palmer Debuts on QVC
Posted by Replere on March 27, 2013

Marching On to Spring!
Posted by Replere on March 26, 2013

Replere February 2013 Fast Facts
Posted by Replere on February 25, 2013

Dr. Debbie Palmer’s Healthy Skin Tips: January 2013
Posted by Replere on January 15, 2013

Refresh, Revitalize and Reinvigorate with REPLERE Beauty Shooters
Posted by Replere on August 21, 2012

Vote for Replere on QVC.com today!
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on June 26, 2012

I’m in Paris!
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on June 06, 2012

Dr. Palmer Talks: Free Radicals
Posted by Replere on June 02, 2012

Replere Comes to Two New Pharmacies in NY/CT Area
Posted by Replere on May 25, 2012

Dr. Debbie was on News Talk 1490 AM, WGCH
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on February 13, 2012

The launch of Replere in Reykjavik, Iceland!
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on February 01, 2011

Great Questions!
Posted by Dr. Debbie Palmer on September 28, 2010

Replere Launches!
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